SN II 12.23 Causes for Liberation

SN II 12.23 Causes for Liberation

 

Upanisa Sutta #

 

 

Residing at Sāvatthi.

 

“I say that it is by knowing and seeing monks,

That the mental movements become still,

Not by not knowing and not seeing.[1]

 

Knowing and seeing what?

 

(1) These are shapes,

These are shapes manifesting,

These are shapes vanishing.[2]

 

(2) These are felt experiences,

These are felt experiences manifesting,

These are felt experiences vanishing.

 

(3) These are concepts,

These are concepts manifesting,

These are concepts vanishing.

 

(4) These are thoughts,

These are thoughts manifesting,

These are thoughts vanishing.

 

(5) This is consciousness,

This is cognition manifesting,

This is cognition vanishing.

 

Knowing and seeing in this way monks,

There is the stilling of the distractions.[3]

 

[Stillness to Lack of Awareness] #

 

 

But monks, I say

In this stillness,

this knowledge of the stilling comes from a cause,

It is not independent.[4]

 

(1) What is the cause for the knowledge of the stilling?

Release should be said.

But this release comes from a cause,

It is not independent.[5]

 

(2) What is the cause for release?

Letting go should be answered.[6]

But this letting go comes from a cause,

It is not independent.

 

(3) What is the cause for letting go?

Disengagement should be answered.

But this disengagement come from a cause,

It is not independent.

 

(4) What is the cause of disengagement?

Discernment should be answered.[7]

But this discernment comes from a cause,

It is not independent.

 

(5) What is the cause of discernment?

Mental Collectedness should be answered.[8]

But this Mental collectedness comes from a cause,

It is not independent.

 

(6) What is the cause for mental collectedness?

Happiness should be answered.[9]

But this happiness comes from a cause,

It is not independent.

 

(7) What is the cause for happiness?

Calm should be answered.[10]

But this calm comes from a cause,

It is not independent.

 

(8) What is the cause for calm?

Joy should be answered.

But this joy comes from a cause,

It is not independent.

 

(9) What is the cause for joy?

Relief should be answered.[11]

But this relief comes from a cause,

It is not independent.

 

(10) What is the cause for relief?

Confidence should be answered.[12]

But this confidence comes from a cause,

It is not independent.

 

(11) What is the cause of confidence?

Trouble should be answered.[13]

But this trouble comes from a cause,

It is not independent.

 

(12) What is the cause of trouble?

Blind reaction should be answered.[14]

But this blind reaction comes from a cause,

It is not independent.

 

(13) What is the cause of blind reaction?

Habit patterns should be answered.[15]

But these habit patterns come from a cause,

They are not independent.

 

(14) What is the cause of habit patterns?

Accumulating should be answered.[16]

But this accumulating comes from a cause,

It is not independent.

 

(15) What is the cause for accumulating?

Discontent should be answered.[17]

But this discontent comes from a cause,

It is not independent.

 

(16) What is the cause of discontent?

All felt experiences should be answered.

But all of these felt experiences come from a condition,

They are not independent.

 

(17) What is the cause of all felt experiences?

Sensory contact should be answered.

But this sensory contact comes from a cause,

It is not independent.

 

(18) What is the cause of sensory contact?

The six senses should be answered.

But these six senses come from a cause,

They are not independent.

 

(19) What is the cause of the six senses?

Mind and matter should be answered.

But this mind and matter comes from a cause,

It is not independent.

 

(20) What is the cause of mind and matter?

Consciousness should be answered.

But this consciousness comes from a cause,

It is not independent.

 

(21) What is the cause of consciousness?

Involuntary processes (of body speech and mind) should be answered.

But these involuntary processes come from a cause,

They are not independent.

 

(22) What is the cause of involuntary processes?[18]

(23) Lack of discernment should be answered.

 

 

[Lack of Discernment to Stillness] #

 

In this way monks,

 

(1) Lack of discernment supports involuntary processes (of body speech and mind);

(2) Involuntary processes support consciousness;

(3) Consciousness supports mind and matter;

(4) Mind and matter support the six senses;

(5) The six senses support sensory contact;

(6) Sensory contact supports all felt experiences;

(7) All felt experiences support discontent;

(8) Discontent supports accumulating;

(9) Accumulating supports habit patterns;

(10) Habit patterns support blind reaction;[19]

(11) Blind reactions support trouble;

 

(12) Trouble supports confidence;

(13) Confidence supports relief;

(14) Relief supports joy;

(15) Joy supports calmness;

(16) Calmness supports happiness;

(17) Happiness supports collectedness;

(18) Collectedness supports discernment;

(19) Discernment support disengagement;

(20) Disengagement supports letting go;

(21) Letting go supports release;

(22) Release supports the knowledge of Stillness. (23)

 

[Mountain Rain Analogy] #

 

Just as when it pours down heavily on the mountain tops,

That water rushes down, filling the main valleys and gorges;

The main valleys and gorges being full, they fill the streams;

The streams being full, they fill the creeks;

The creeks being full, they fill the rivers;

The rivers being full, they fill the estuaries;

The estuaries being full, they fill the great ocean.

 

In the same way monks;

 

(1) Lack of discernment supports involuntary processes (of body speech and mind);

(2) Involuntary processes support consciousness;

(3) Consciousness supports mind and matter;

(4) Mind and matter support the six senses;

(5) The six senses support sensory contact;

(6) Sensory contact supports all felt experiences;

(7) All felt experiences support discontent;

(8) Discontent supports accumulating;

(9) Accumulating supports habit patterns;

(10) Habit patterns support blind reaction;[20]

(11) Blind reactions support trouble;

 

(12) Trouble supports confidence;

(13) Confidence supports relief;

(14) Relief supports joy;

(15) Joy supports calmness;

(16) Calmness supports happiness;

(17) Happiness supports collectedness;

(18) Collectedness supports discernment;

(19) Discernment support disengagement;

(20) Disengagement supports letting go;

(21) Letting go supports release;

(22) Release supports the knowledge of Stillness. (23)

 

 

[1] “Jānato ahaṃ, bhikkhave, passato  āsavānaṃ khayaṃ vadāmi, no ajānato no apassato.

[2] Iti rūpaṃ, iti rūpassa samudayo, iti rūpassa atthaṅgamo.

[3] Evaṃ kho, bhikkhave, jānato evaṃ passato āsavānaṃ khayo hoti.

[4] Yampissa taṃ, bhikkhave, khayasmiṃ khayeñāṇaṃ, tampi saupanisaṃ vadāmi, no anupanisaṃ.

[5] Kā ca, bhikkhave, khayeñāṇassa upanisā? ‘Vimuttī’tissa vacanīyaṃ. Vimuttimpāhaṃ, bhikkhave, saupanisaṃ vadāmi, no anupanisaṃ.

[6] Virāga

[7] Yathābhūtañāṇadassana

[8] Samādhi

[9] Sukha

[10] Passadhi

[11] Pāmojja: Gladness, relief

[12] Saddhā

[13] Dukkha

[14] Jāti: Lit.: Birth (Rebirth), Practically: This is taking action in the physical plane. It can also be understood as the birth of every moment, of every conditioned processes (Saṅkhāra), their generation. Kamma. Blind action.

[15] Bhavo: Mental conditioning.

[16] Upādāna: Accumulating, holding on. This accumulating happens because of ‘not letting go’ (upa-adāna).

[17] Taṇhā: Lit.: Thirst. Practically: Discontent, dissatisfaction. (Longing for something that is not; Disliking something that is.)

[18] Saṅkhāra: Built-in conditionings, automated processes.

[19] Birth of Kamma every moment.

[20] Birth of Kamma every moment.